Link to the our Registration with the ACNCDrug Policy Australia is a public health NGO primarily concerned with promoting new approaches to minimise the health risks and other harms caused by the use of both licit and illicit Drugs which affects the wellbeing of all Australians.

Facts change minds

"We believe that legally enforced abstinence is unrealistic and counter-productive in modern Australia which has one of the highest per capita consumption rates of illicit drugs in the western world."

According to the 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey published by the Australian Government's Institute of Health and Welfare, 3 million Australians aged over 14 used illicit drugs within the preceding 12-months. It is estimated that Australians spend over $7 billion a year on illicit recreational drugs.

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Current Articles

 


Prohibition does not protect our children

Drug prohibition is not protecting young Australians; it is killing them.

Last weekend, an apparently tainted batch of illegal drugs caused the needless deaths of three Melbournians and left another 20 hospitalised. In 2015, six ecstasy-related deaths were reported at Australian music festivals, and the latest statistics show that, on average, four Australians die every day from drug overdose. That's 1400 people per year. 

Festival image by METCALFE VIA GETTY IMAGES

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Recreational MDMA testing - a European perspective

As the United States experiences an overwhelming opioid crisis; as the world's press is flooded with extra-judicial killings targeting drug "offenders" in the Philippines; as young Australians overdose on novel psychoactive substances and teenagers in the UK on ecstasy, there can be only one certainty: drugs are here to stay. Despite some countries reaffirming farcical commitments to a drug-free world, with over $100bn spent annually on the War on Drugs, and 20% of the world's prison population incarcerated on drug offences, drugs have never been cheaper or purer.

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Providing regulated drug markets remain a pipe-dream (excluding cannabis) and transnational drug supply the remit of the criminal underworld; profit will always reign supreme. To maximise profit, drugs are frequently diluted with adulterants to make two kilos into three, or simply mimicked by cheaper, possibly harmful, replacements. Whilst some adulterants are benign (caffeine in cocaine), many are not (PMA/PMMA in ecstasy, fentanyl in heroin).  Consequently, in addition to the known potential harms intrinsic to any given drug, users expose themselves to an array of truly unknown harms.

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What makes it so hard to quit drugs?

Nicole Lee, Curtin University

Most people who use alcohol and other drugs do so infrequently and never become dependent (or "addicted" as it's sometimes called). On average about 10% of people who use alcohol or other drugs are dependent. The rate is around 6% for alcohol, around 10% for cannabis and around 15% for methamphetamine.

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But for those who do become dependent, reducing their use, getting off or staying off can be difficult.

What happens to the brain on drugs?

Drugs affect how messages are sent through to the brain.

Regardless of how it is consumed, alcohol and other drugs eventually make their way into the brain via the bloodstream. Once there, they affect how messages are sent through the brain.

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Australia's Drug Policies Have Failed

It's time to reinvent them based on what actually works

Alison Ritter, UNSW Australia The author speaking at the UNSW UNSOMNIA event.

There is only one way to make better decisions about illicit drugs and so save lives and money: we need to change the way drugs policies are made.

The alternative is to remain stuck in the same futile cycle. Every time a young person dies tragically and needlessly at a music festival or dance party, our commentators clamour for our politicians to respond immediately.

We make drugs policies on the run. But policy quick-fixes are mostly ineffective and we find ourselves no better prepared to avert future tragedies or drug-related harm.

We can do much better. We have decades of research that tells us what works and why, and we are continuously building that evidence base. Smarter drugs policy-making would use that evidence, in conjunction with other policy drivers such as public opinion and personal experience.

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What is NBOMe?

Explainer: what is NBOMe?

Stephen Bright, Curtin University and Monica Barratt, Curtin University

NBOMe is an abbreviation for N-methoxybenzyl. While NBOMe is often referred to as a drug, it's not a singular drug but a series of drugs that contain an N-methoxybenzyl group.

The most common NBOMes that are used recreationally are extensions of the 2C family of phenethylamine psychedelics that were discovered by Dr Alexander Shulgin. Some, such as 2C-B, became popular in the 1990s as a substitute for MDMA (commonly referred to as ecstasy). The 2C-B NBOMe derivative is 25B-NBOMe. Other common NBOMes include 25I-NBOMe and 25C-NBOMe.

computer-girl.jpg NBOMe drugs can be purchased online. Image from shutterstock.com

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New Killer Drugs in Australia?

Is Australia really being flooded by new killer drugs?

Stephen Bright, Curtin University and Monica Barratt, UNSW Australia

Recent media reports have suggested Australia is set to be flooded with new types of deadly "synthetic" drugs.

Don't worry, as far as we know, there's no "turbo-charged version of ice" on its way. And we need to steer clear of drug-related moral panic, which increases stigma and makes it harder for users to seek help.

But there is a potential for significant harm in Australia if we don't have adequate systems in place to monitor our drug markets and respond rapidly when specific dangers are detected.

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